June 2, 2020 UMD Home FabLab AIMLab


A research collaboration involving Maryland NanoCenter members, Dr. Reza Ghodssi, Dr. Gary Rubloff, and Dr. Bill Bentley from the Department of Bioengineering, working closely with Greg Payne of the University of Maryland Biotechnology Institute (UMBI) have developed a nanoscale sensor system which can detect exceedingly small quantities of explosives, chemicals, and other potentially hazardous materials. Chitosan, which is derived from the shells of blue crab, coat the components of the sensor and interact with these various substances. The potential uses of these sensors could be in airports, hospitals, and laboratories.

Ghodssi and his collaborators have recently submitted a proposal to the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to develop a sensor system to detect the presence of avian flu.

The technology was developed and initially tested at the Laboratory for Physical Sciences (LPS) in College Park, Md., and it is currently sponsored by LPS and the National Science Foundation (NSF).

For more information, please see the Clark School press release on this research.

August 1, 2006


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