June 6, 2020 UMD Home FabLab AIMLab



Researchers have found a way to coat corrosive but highly energetic lithium metal anodes with an atoms-thick layer of alumina to make lithium-ion batteries last longer.

Alexander Kozen, of the University of Maryland’s Department of Materials Science and the Institute for Systems Research, and his colleague Malachi Noked (also in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry,) used a technique borrowed from the semiconductor industry –- atomic layer deposition (ALD) -- to put down a layer of aluminum oxide, 14 nanometers thick, all around the anode.

The research was funded by DOE's Nanostructures for Electrical Energy Storage (NEES), an Energy Frontier Research Center. "The mission of the center is to reveal the science of nanostructures in batteries to develop methodologies to help prevent problems," said Gary Rubloff (MSE/ISR), Director of the NEES Center.

Lithium metal is widely known as a promising anode material. But the high reactivity of lithium metal presents major challenges that may impede commercial adoption. Most candidates for a next-generation, beyond-lithium-ion battery rely on using reactive metal anodes. However, with a protection layers, bare lithium metal reacts with organic electrolytes, which can reduce battery  capacity and possibly form tree-shaped dendrites capable of shorting out the battery or causing an explosion.

Kozen said that aluminum oxide is simple and relatively inexpensive to use, though the team says they are investigating other higher performance coatings.

'The technique has been used in computer chip-making, so establishing a  parallel infrastructure  for the  battery industry is reasonable,' said Noked.

The team reports improved lithium-sulfur battery capacity for 100 charge-discharge cycles, an important milestone to demonstrate the efficacy of this technique as a proof of concept.

Results were published in the journal ACS Nano.

 

Next-Generation Lithium Metal Anode Engineering via Atomic Layer Deposition

Alexander C. Kozen, Chuan-Fu Lin, Alexander J. Pearse, Marshall A. Schroeder, Xiaogang Han,

Liangbing Hu, Sang Bok Lee, Gary W. Rubloff, and Malachi Noked

DOI: 10.1021/acsnano.5b02166

 

June 9, 2015



June 9, 2015


«Previous Story  

 

 

Current Headlines

Pines: Stand in Solidarity, Unite Against Injustice

Promoting Diversity and Addressing Unconscious Bias

MSE Alum Awarded NSF Graduate Research Fellowship

UMD Researchers Design ‘Open’ Lithium-ion Battery

UMD Research Lab Receives ARO Grant to Investigate Reconfigurable Nanoparticle Assemblies

Two Engineers Among 2020-2021 Distinguished Scholar-Teachers

2020 Undergraduate Honors and Awards

Cleaning Natural Methane for Better Access to Renewable Energy

New, superfast method for ceramic manufacturing could open door to AI-driven materials discovery

Advance made towards next-generation rechargable batteries

 

Colleges A. James Clark School of Engineering
The College of Computer, Mathematical, and Natural Sciences

Communicate Contact Us
Contact the Webmaster
Google+
Follow us on TwitterTwitter logo

Links Privacy Policy
Sitemap
RSS

Copyright The University of Maryland University of Maryland
2004-2020